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Materials About the Federal Rules

The materials listed below, produced or made available by the Center, are related to the Federal Rules of Procedure (civil, criminal, evidence, appellate, and bankruptcy).

For a list of projects or other reports of FJC research that the Center has published, click on Research Projects or Reports and Studies.

Displaying 31 - 40 of 199
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FJC Directions, No. 1

A magazine that reported Center research and education activities in a concise format. In this issue of FJC Directions:

  • Observations from the Pilot Sentencing Institute for the Fifth and Eleventh Circuits, by Barbara S. Meierhoefer, page 3
  • Trends in Summary Judgment Practice: A Summary of Findings, by Joe S. Cecil, page 11. A second assessment of changes in summary judgment practice (see Summary Judgment Practice in Three District Courts). This study, examining practices in six federal district courts across a 14-year period, found that the percentage of cases with motions for summary judgment varies greatly by district and type of case. In torts and civil rights cases, motions for summary judgment have increased since 1975, whereas in prisoner cases they have dropped sharply. No increases in such motions were found since a series of decisions by the Supreme Court in 1986 clarifying the standards for summary judgment. Summary judgments are reversed at a rate that is similar to that of other civil appeals, and usually on an interpretation of substantive law rather than an overlooked material fact.
Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, Fed. R. Civil P. 56 April 1, 1991
Form 51: Order of General Reference to Magistrate Judges Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure, Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, Fed. R. Civil P. 72, Fed. R. Civil P. 73 September 27, 1991
FJC Directions, No. 2: Special Issue on Rule 11

A magazine that reported Center research and education activities in a concise format. Centered around a study undertaken by the Center to assess the operation and impact of Fed. R. Civ. P. 11, this issue of FJC Directions describes Rule 11 activity in the federal courts, answers central questions about use of the rule, reports judges' assessments of the rule, and outlines proposed changes to the rule. Included is the text of an amended Rule 11 proposed by the Judicial Conference's Advisory Committee on Civil Rules. In this issue of FJC Directions:

  • The Federal Judicial Center's Study of Rule 11, by Elizabeth C. Wiggins, Thomas E. Willging, and Donna Stienstra, page 3
  • Rule 11 Activity in the Federal Courts, by Elizabeth C. Wiggins, Thomas E. Willging, and Donna Stienstra, page 6
  • Central Questions about the Use of Rule 11, by Elizabeth C. Wiggins, Thomas E. Willging, and Donna Stienstra, page 10
  • Judicial Assessments of Rule 11: Its Effectiveness and Its Impact on Litigation in Federal Court, by Elizabeth C. Wiggins, Thomas E. Willging, and Donna Stienstra, page 28
  • Proposed Changes in Rule 11, by Elizabeth C. Wiggins, Thomas E. Willging, and Donna Stienstra, page 35
  • Text of Proposed Amended Rule 11, page 40
Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, Fed. R. Civil P. 11 November 1, 1991
FJC Directions, No. 4

A magazine that reported Center research and education activities in a concise format. In this issue of FJC Directions:

  • New Developments in Court Education: Taking It to the People, by Emily Z. Huebner, page 1
  • Defining a Role for Court-Appointed Experts, by Joe S. Cecil and Thomas E. Willging, page 6
Federal Rules of Evidence, Fed. R. Evid. 706 August 1, 1992
Court-Appointed Experts: Defining the Role of Experts Appointed Under Federal Rule of Evidence 706

A study of why judges rarely appoint experts under Rule 706. In discussing this issue with judges, the authors learned of techniques and procedures that may aid judges when considering whether to appoint an expert or when managing an expert who has been appointed. These suggestions are collected in the final chapter of this report.

Fed. R. Evid. 706 January 1, 1993
Special Masters [Superseded]

Offers suggestions for the use of special masters pursuant to Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 53.

Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure, Fed. R. Crim. P. 53 January 1, 1994
Rule 1006: Paying Filing Fee Installments through the Chapter 13 Trustee

Survey results regarding suggested changes to Fed. R. Bankr. 1006 are presented in this memo.

Fed. R. Bankr. P. 1006 February 21, 1994
Implementation of Disclosure in United States District Courts, With Specific Attention to Courts' Responses to Selected Amendments to Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 26 [Superseded]

Report on the federal district courts' responses to the 1993 amendments to FRCP 26. Tables describe courts' local rules, general orders, and CJRA plans by indicating which of five key provisions of Rule 26 are in effect.

Superseded by Implementation of Disclosure in United States District Courts, With Specific Attention to Courts' Responses to Selected Amendments to Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 26 (March 24, 1995).

Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure, Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, Fed. R. Civil P. 26 March 1, 1994
Protective Order Activity in Three Federal Judicial Districts: Interim Report to the Advisory Committee on Civil Rules

Interim report to the Judicial Conference Advisory Committee on Civil Rules providing information that was used in evaluating the need for additional provisions in the rules relating to sealed court records and sealed settlement agreements.

The 1996 final report is available here: Protective Order Activity in Three Federal Judicial Districts: Report to the Advisory Committee on Civil Rules (1996).

Fed. R. Civil P. 26 October 14, 1994
Report of a Survey Concerning Rule 11, Federal Rules of Civil Procedure

A report of the results of a Center survey that sought federal trial attorneys' and federal district judges' views of the effects of Rule 11 before 1993, the effects of amendments to Rule 11 that became effective December 1, 1993, and the merits of proposals that would in large measure reverse the 1993 amendments. The results suggest that a majority of respondents generally oppose the proposed changes to Rule 11, with one exception: a majority believe that the purpose of Rule 11 sanctions should encompass compensation of parties injured by violations of Rule 11 as well as deterrence of such violations.

Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, Fed. R. Civil P. 11 January 1, 1995

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