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Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure

Displaying 31 - 40 of 90, sorted by most recent
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Gene E.K. Pratter
December 1, 2015

An amendment to Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 1, which became effective on December 1, 2015, resulted from a finding that civil litigation is resolved more quickly and less expensively when parties and lawyers cooperate.

David G. Campbell
December 1, 2015

Amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, which became effective on December 1, 2015, foster more cost-effective discovery through cooperation, proportionality, early and active case management, and considerations of electronically stored information (ESI).

December 1, 2015

This comparison chart was prepared by the District of Maryland to show 2015 amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure.

Paul W. Grimm
December 1, 2015

Amendments to Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 37(e), which became effective on December 1, 2015, specify that sanctions for failure to preserve electronically stored information (ESI) require findings that (1) the ESI should have been preserved in the anticipation of litigation, (2) the party fai

October 29, 2015

This supplemental package of materials was transmitted to the Supreme Court on October 29, 2015, concerning amendments to the Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure to become effective on December 1, 2016.

October 9, 2015

This package of materials was transmitted to the U.S. Supreme Court on October 9, 2015, concerning amendments to the Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure to become effective on December 1, 2016.

April 29, 2015

This package of materials was transmitted to Congress on April 29, 2015, concerning amendments to the Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure to become effective on December 1, 2015.

Marie Leary
October 1, 2013

This report to the Judicial Conference’s Advisory Committee on Appellate Rules focused on class action objector appeals filed in the Second, Seventh, and Ninth Circuits from settlements approved by the district courts in class actions filed after January 1, 2008.

Robert Timothy Reagan
July 8, 2012

Among the reasons that courts issue protective orders in both civil and criminal cases is to keep discovery confidential on a showing of good cause. Experience has proved confidentiality protective orders to grease the wheels of discovery in many cases.

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