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Federal Judicial History

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Format: 2020
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This volume presents recent scholarship on the history of the federal court system.  The main themes include the practices and importance of the lower federal courts, the relationship between district and circuit courts and the Supreme Court, and the broader role of the federal court system in American economy and society.

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This unique bankruptcy time line maps the evolution of bankruptcy law from its inception in 1787 in the U.S. Constitution through 2019. It also provides statistics demonstrating the burgeoning bankruptcy caseloads, and historical snapshots of select sociopolitical events that occurred along the way.

The dimensions of the printed poster are 24" x 54". 

The time line is also available as a brochure.

 

In Print: Available for Distribution

This bankruptcy time line maps the evolution of bankruptcy law from its inception in 1787 in the U.S. Constitution through 2019. It also provides statistics demonstrating the fluctuating bankruptcy caseloads, and historical snapshots of select sociopolitical events that occurred along the way.

The time line is also available as a 24" x 54" printed poster.

Available Online Only

This guide provides information for judges about organizing, managing, and storing physical documents and electronic materials in chambers. It discusses the importance of federal judges' papers as a documentary record of judges' careers and the work of the federal courts. The guide describes how students of the federal courts use judges' papers and offers guidelines for judges' selection of a repository to house a collection.

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The concluding volume of the series covers debates concerning structural changes to the federal courts, including the creation of the U.S. magistrate and U.S. bankruptcy judge positions, and alterations to the federal appellate system, including the division of the Fifth Circuit, the creation of the Federal Circuit, and proposals for a national court of appeals. A section on criminal justice reform recounts debates over access to counsel for indigent defendants, detention before trial, habeas corpus, and the creation of the U.S. Sentencing Commission. The volume also covers proposed civil justice initiatives regarding diversity jurisdiction, class actions, case management, alternative dispute resolution, and the creation of the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation, and concludes with discussions on the discipline of federal judges, including proposals for a nonimpeachment method for judicial removal.  

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This volume of the documentary history collection introduces readers to public debates on proposals to alter the organization, jurisdiction, and administration of the federal courts, as well as the tenure and authority of federal judges, during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The documents illustrate the contending views of lawyers, judges, legislators, legal scholars, and ordinary citizens on the judiciary’s role in American constitutional government. Documents are drawn from a variety of governmental and nongovernmental sources, including congressional floor debates, testimony in congressional hearings, bar association meetings, public addresses, legal treatises, law reviews, and popular periodicals.
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The first volume of the Documentary History of Debates on the Federal Judiciary traces the long process of defining the judiciary within the relatively brief outline provided by the Constitution. The volume includes annotated excerpts from debates on the establishment and jurisdiction of federal trial courts, judicial tenure and the impeachment of judges, judicial review of state court decisions, circuit riding and the expansion of the court system to serve a growing nation, and the impact of the Civil War on the federal courts.
Archival Copy on File

This unique bankruptcy time line maps the evolution of bankruptcy law from its inception in 1787 in the U.S. Constitution through 2011. It also provides statistics demonstrating the burgeoning bankruptcy caseloads, and historical snapshots of select sociopolitical events that occurred along the way.

Superseded by The Evolution of U.S. Bankruptcy Law: a time line (2019).

In Print: Available for Distribution

This guide describes the records of the federal courts, as well as records of Congress and the executive branch, that are relevant to researching federal judicial history. Note: Minor updates may occasionally be made to this document. Please consult the electronic version for the most current information.

 

In Print: Available for Distribution

A publication that discusses the importance of federal judges' papers as a documentary record of judges' careers and the work of the federal courts. The guide describes how students of the federal courts use judges' papers and offers guidelines for judges' selection of a repository to house a collection. The guide also offers recommendations for the management of documents in chambers.

Superseded by A Guide to the Preservation of Federal Judges' Papers, Third Edition (2018).

 

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