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Federal Judicial History

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Provides a historical perspective on the reasons federal judges have left the bench. The study focuses on the fewer than 200 judges who, over the last 200 years, resigned from the bench for stated reasons other than age or health. The Center prepared the study for the National Commission on Judicial Discipline and Removal.

Archival Copy on File

In this issue:

  • The Federal Judicial History Office has been notified of the following new programs, publications and projects
  • News of the Federal Judicial History Office
  • Restored Courthouse Serves Australia as Law Museum

The Court Historian was an occasional newsletter (discontinued) from the Federal Judicial History Office.

All issues published from 1989 to 1998.

Archival Copy on File

A directory to some 900 oral history interviews with federal judges and other persons involved in federal litigation or associated with the federal courts. The directory was compiled from a nation-wide survey of courts, libraries, and historical societies and from bibliographies of oral histories. The volume includes a form for reporting newly discovered interviews to the Center's Federal Judicial History Office.

Archival Copy on File

In this issue:

  • Oral History Interviews with Federal Judges
  • Judicial Conference Committee on the Bicentennial of the Constitution Announces Recipients of Judicial History Grants

The Court Historian was an occasional newsletter (discontinued) from the Federal Judicial History Office.

All issues published from 1989 to 1998.

Archival Copy on File

In this issue:

  • Bankruptcy Case Files an Underutilized Source for Social and Economic History
  • Events in the Life of a Bankruptcy Case File
  • The Arkansas Federal Judicial History Project
  • First Court History Seminar to be held in Washington, D.C.

The Court Historian was an occasional newsletter (discontinued) from the Federal Judicial History Office.

All issues published from 1989 to 1998.

Archival Copy on File

In this issue:

  • Historical Publications Sponsored by Court History Programs and Related Agencies

The Court Historian was an occasional newsletter (discontinued) from the Federal Judicial History Office.

All issues published from 1989 to 1998.

Archival Copy on File

In this issue:

  • Judicial History Program Inaugurated by the Federal Judicial Center
  • Federal Court History Programs (December 1988)
  • Judicial Districts and Circuits of the United States Courts, 1789 (map)

The Court Historian was an occasional newsletter (discontinued) from the Federal Judicial History Office.

All issues published from 1989 to 1998.

Archival Copy on File

A historical survey published in connection with the bicentennial year of the First Judiciary Act, signed September 24, 1789. The text explains the provisions of the 1789 statute, the compromises it embodies, and the conditions and debates that led to the passage of the Evarts Act in 1891, which established the three-tiered system that characterizes federal court structure today. The publication is illustrated by 12 maps that describe the growth and evolution of the districts and circuits.

Superseded by Creating the Federal Judicial System, Second Edition (1994).

In Print: Available for Distribution

A shorter version of the 44-page bibliography, consisting of an annotated list of seventeen books and articles.

In Print: Available for Distribution

An extensive listing of leading works on the Constitutional Convention of 1787, its causes, and subsequent events. The bibliography was prepared to assist the federal judiciary with participation in the celebration of the bicentennial of the U.S. Constitution.

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