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The concluding volume of the series covers debates concerning structural changes to the federal courts, including the creation of the U.S. magistrate and U.S. bankruptcy judge positions, and alterations to the federal appellate system, including the division of the Fifth Circuit, the creation of the Federal Circuit, and proposals for a national court of appeals. A section on criminal justice reform recounts debates over access to counsel for indigent defendants, detention before trial, habeas corpus, and the creation of the U.S. Sentencing Commission. The volume also covers proposed civil justice initiatives regarding diversity jurisdiction, class actions, case management, alternative dispute resolution, and the creation of the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation, and concludes with discussions on the discipline of federal judges, including proposals for a nonimpeachment method for judicial removal.  

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Under § 921(b) of the Bankruptcy Code, the chief judge of the court of appeals designates the bankruptcy judge to administer the case. This page provides resources regarding the designation of the bankruptcy judge in a Chapter 9 case, including general guidance for the bankruptcy clerk of court in requesting the designation of a bankruptcy judge from the court of appeals, CM/ECF event codes needed for the designation, a sample request and order for designation, and requests and designation orders used in a selection of cases.

Designation of Bankruptcy Judge is one of several Chapter 9 Online Repository categories.

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The Judicial Conference Advisory Committee on Appellate Rules requested this report on circuit practices for awarding costs under Rule 39 of the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure. The report describes the variations among the circuits' rules and procedures, compares how the circuits have implemented Fed. R. App. P 39, and presents a comparative analysis of costs awards. It also offers some procedural and conclusory observations from the research.

During the period January through April of 2007, a case-budgeting attorney (CBA) was hired in each of the Second, Sixth, and Ninth Circuits as part of the Case-Budgeting Attorney Pilot Project authorized by the Judicial Conference of the United States. The primary responsibilities of the CBAs were providing objective case-budgeting advice to attorneys and judges and enhancing case management in the pilot circuits. The Judicial Conference’s Committee on Defender Services asked the Federal Judicial Center to conduct an evaluation of the pilot program. This appendix supplements the final report that was submitted on December 20, 2010.

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During the period January through April of 2007, a case-budgeting attorney (CBA) was hired in each of the Second, Sixth, and Ninth Circuits as part of the Case-Budgeting Attorney Pilot Project authorized by the Judicial Conference of the United States. The primary responsibilities of the CBAs were providing objective case-budgeting advice to attorneys and judges and enhancing case management in the pilot circuits. The Judicial Conference’s Committee on Defender Services asked the Federal Judicial Center to conduct an evaluation of the pilot program. This final report was submitted on December 20, 2010.
 
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Section 1983 Litigation, Section Edition analyzes the fundamental issues that arise in litigation under 42 U.S.C. - 1983, and the case law interpreting those issues. This edition contains new sections on jury instructions and the Rooker-Feldman Doctrine, new material on retaliatory prosecutions, and expanded coverage on jurisdiction. Research for this edition concluded with the October 2007 Supreme Court term and covers courts of appeals decisions reported through June 30, 2008.

Superseded by Section 1983 Litigation, Third Edition (2014).

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This report describes the ways in which videoconferencing is used in the courts of appeals. Appellate judges with varying degrees of experience with videoconferencing identify advantages and disadvantages of using videoconferencing for oral arguments and other court business, describe the extent to which videoconferencing altered the dynamic between judge and attorney during oral arguments, and report any problems they had encountered in using the technology.

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The Appellate Rules Advisory Committee has written a new Rule 32.1 which permits attorneys and courts in federal appeals in all circuits to cite unpublished opinions. At its June 2004 meeting, the Standing Committee on Rules of Practice and Procedure asked the Appellate Rules Advisory Committee to ask the Federal Judicial Center to conduct empirical research that would yield results helpful to the Standing Committee's consideration of the proposed rule. The Center's research effort consisted of three components: (1) a survey of judges, (2) a survey of attorneys, and (3) a survey of case files. This report was presented to and considered by the Standing Committee during its June 15-16, 2005 meeting, at which it approved the Advisory Committee's proposed rule for consideration by the Judicial Conference at its September 2005 meeting.

This report was subsequently published as Citing Unpublished Opinions in Federal Appeals (2005).

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