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June 6, 2011
Emery G. Lee

In 2010, the Judicial Conference Advisory Committee on Civil Rules requested a study of motions for sanctions based on an allegation that the nonmoving party had destroyed evidence, especially electronically stored information (ESI). The study examined the electronic docket records of civil cases filed in 2007–2008 in 19 districts, including at least one district in every circuit except the District of Columbia Circuit. This report summarizes the findings of that study and, where appropriate, compares those findings to other studies.

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May 22, 2009
Vaughn R. Walker

In re NSA Telecommunication Records Litigation (N.D. Cal. 3:06-md-1791).

This document is among Selected Orders and Other Case Documents that, in turn, are among the Center's resources on National Security Cases.

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February 6, 2009
Royce C. Lamberth

Horn v. Huddle (D.D.C. 1:94-cv-1756).

This document is among Selected Orders and Other Case Documents that, in turn, are among the Center's resources on National Security Cases.

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February 24, 2005
David E. Rauma, Thomas E. Willging

A report of the results of a survey completed by 278 of 400 (70%) federal district judges in the winter of 2004-05. The Center conducted the study at the request of the Judicial Conference's Advisory Committee on Civil Rules. A questionnaire elicited the judges' experiences and opinions about the merits of past and current versions of Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 11 and about a legislative proposal to modify Rule 11. The judges expressed a strong preference for Rule 11 in its current form.

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January 1, 1995
John E. Shapard, George W. Cort, Marie Leary, Thomas E. Willging, Elizabeth C. Wiggins, Kim McLaurin

A report of the results of a Center survey that sought federal trial attorneys' and federal district judges' views of the effects of Rule 11 before 1993, the effects of amendments to Rule 11 that became effective December 1, 1993, and the merits of proposals that would in large measure reverse the 1993 amendments.

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November 1, 1991
Elizabeth C. Wiggins, Thomas E. Willging, Donna J. Stienstra

A magazine that reported Center research and education activities in a concise format. Centered around a study undertaken by the Center to assess the operation and impact of Fed. R. Civ. P. 11, this issue of FJC Directions describes Rule 11 activity in the federal courts, answers central questions about use of the rule, reports judges' assessments of the rule, and outlines proposed changes to the rule.

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January 1, 1991
Elizabeth C. Wiggins, Thomas E. Willging, Donna J. Stienstra, Michael E. Barnsback

Report on an empirical study of Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 11. The Research Division of the FJC undertook the study to assist the Advisory Committee on Civil Rules in its evaluation of the rule. The study has three major components: (1) a survey of all federal district judges about their experiences with Rule 11; (2) an analysis of all district and appellate opinions published between 1984 and 1989 that address Rules 11 issues; and (3) a study of Rule 11 activity in five district courts.

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January 1, 1988
Thomas E. Willging

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January 1, 1988
Thomas E. Willging

A report that discusses the possible chilling effects and potential for creating satellite litigation of Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 11 (before the 1993 amendment that increased judges' discretion as to imposing sanctions). It also discusses the nature and adequacy of procedures used to implement the rule. The report is based on interviews with judges and lawyers in eight districts. The author describes his methodology and reports his empirical findings.

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January 1, 1987
A. Leo Levin, Syl Sobel

A paper that examines the application of the sanctions provisions of Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 11 during the first few years after the 1983 amendments to the rule, with emphasis on appellate cases. The paper describes emerging patterns, identifying situations in which the appellate courts have found sanctions to be clearly applicable and situations in which appellate courts have demonstrated restraint in applying the rule to certain litigation practices.

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