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February 12, 2018

Thinking for a Change is one of several cognitive behavioral interventions used by federal probation and pretrial services offices to help clients succeed during and after supervision and thus reduce recidivism.  Officers volunteer to facilitate the intensive 13-week program, and most find that their time and energy commitments are more than worth it. The Eastern District of Wisconsin Probation Office adopted T4C, as it’s often called, in 2012 and now has more than two dozen officers trained as facilitators.

December 1, 2017

Federal Rules of Evidence 902(13) and 902(14), which became effective on December 1, 2017, provide for the self-authentication of electronic evidence. Under these rules, electronic evidence can be authenticated by certification instead of by testimony. Rule 902(13) applies to electronic evidence such as computer files, social media posts, and smart device data. Rule 902(14) applies to electronic copies.

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November 20, 2017
Jed S. Rakoff

Judge Jed S. Rakoff (S.D.N.Y.) summarizes the materials on this site about fingerprint identification and what judges should consider when weighing expert testimony. To go back to the main Fingerprint Identification page, click here.

November 20, 2017

This video covers the quality assurance programs implemented by the forensic laboratories throughout the country. For more information, please refer to the Discipline-Specific Baseline Documents section at the NIST.gov(link is external) website. To go back to the main Fingerprint Identification page, click here.

November 20, 2017

A brief introduction to fingerprints: How fingerprint properties (uniqueness, consistency, and ridge pattern) make fingerprints a useful forensic tool. To go back to the main Fingerprint Identification page, click here.

November 20, 2017
Jed S. Rakoff

Judge Jed S. Rakoff (S.D.N.Y.) introduces website materials that cover fingerprint identification and what judges should consider when considering and responding to challenges to the admissibility of fingerprint evidence and testimony. To go back to the main Fingerprint Identification page, click here.

May 1, 2014
T. Markus Funk

The investigation of transnational conduct often involves gathering evidence located in foreign countries. There are two primary means of obtaining evidence for use in a transnational proceeding: a Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty (MLAT) and a letter rogatory. This guide provides an overview of the statutory schemes and procedural matters that distinguish MLATs and letters rogatory, and it discusses legal issues that arise when the prosecution, the defense, or a civil litigant seeks to obtain evidence from abroad as part of a criminal or civil proceeding.

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March 2, 2012
Tim Reagan, Margaret S. Williams

This report was prepared for the Advisory Committee on the Federal Rules of Evidence. Under the current version of Fed. R. Evid. 801(d)(1)(B), prior consistent statements are admissible for their substance as well as for their rehabilitation only if they rebut recent fabrication because they occurred before the fabrication motive. If a prior consistent statement is admissible for credibility but not admissible for substance, the opposing party is entitled to a jury instruction.

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June 6, 2011
Emery G. Lee

In 2010, the Judicial Conference Advisory Committee on Civil Rules requested a study of motions for sanctions based on an allegation that the nonmoving party had destroyed evidence, especially electronically stored information (ESI). The study examined the electronic docket records of civil cases filed in 2007–2008 in 19 districts, including at least one district in every circuit except the District of Columbia Circuit. This report summarizes the findings of that study and, where appropriate, compares those findings to other studies.

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