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Constitutional Law

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July 9, 2018
John S. Cooke, James A. Chance, Elizabeth C. Wiggins, Erwin Chemerinsky, Laurie Levenson, Suzanna Sherry, Anne Fleming

Some of the nation’s top legal scholars discuss the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2017–2018 term and analyze the decisions that are most likely to affect the work of federal judges. Among the decisions discussed will be those involving the First, Fourth, and Fifth Amendments as well as bankruptcy law, immigration law, and the federal courts.

This is the final program in the series Supreme Court: The Term in Review, which was produced from 2001 to 2018.

July 6, 2018
Bernice B. Donald, Rebecca R. Pallmeyer

In her introduction to these informative videos, Judge Rebecca Pallmeyer of the Northern District of Illinois describes employment discrimination law as one of the most dynamic fields of federal law. Together Judge Pallmeyer and Judge Bernice Donald of the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals examine examples and interpretations of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the various amendments and federal statutes that have expanded protections to various protected classes.

October 24, 2017

This page includes orders related to the court’s continuing jurisdiction after the entry of the confirmation order for purposes of implementing the plan and closing the case. The judge’s post confirmation jurisdiction over Chapter 9 cases remains subject to the sovereignty of the state and the potential Tenth Amendment issues.

Postconfirmation is one of several Chapter 9 Online Repository categories.

October 19, 2017

The Eighth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution prohibits the government from requiring a criminal defendant to pay "excessive bail" in order to get out of jail before trial. Nevertheless, nearly half a million people across the country are in pretrial detention. The collateral consequences of detention can affect a defendant's employment status, housing situation, and mental health, among other facets of his or her life.

October 19, 2017

The Eighth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution prohibits the government from requiring a criminal defendant to pay "excessive bail" in order to get out of jail before trial. Nevertheless, nearly half a million people across the country are in pretrial detention.

July 19, 2017

Some of the nation's top legal scholars discuss the U.S. Supreme Court's 2016–2017 term and analyze the decisions that are most likely to affect the work of federal judges. Among the decisions discussed will be those involving the First, Fourth, and Fifth Amendments as well as criminal law and procedure, patent law, and the federal courts.

March 1, 1998

In this issue:

  • The Amistad Case and the Federal Courts
  • Documenting the Careers of Federal Judges

The Court Historian was an occasional newsletter (discontinued) from the Federal Judicial History Office.

All issues published from 1989 to 1998.

Downloadable file:
August 2, 1993
Robert W. Kastenmeier

In 1990, Congress created the National Commission on Judicial Discipline and Removal, who's charge included investigation of problems related to the discipline and removal of life-tenured federal judges, and evaluation of alternatives to current arrangements for judicial discipline and removal, including statutory and constitutional amendments.

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