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Materials About the Federal Rules

The materials listed below, produced or made available by the Center, are related to the Federal Rules of Procedure (civil, criminal, evidence, appellate, and bankruptcy).

For a list of projects or other reports of FJC research that the Center has published, click on Research Projects or Reports and Studies.

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Amendments to the Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure 2021—Transmittal to the Supreme Court

This package of materials was transmitted to the U.S. Supreme Court on October 20, 2020, concerning amendments to the Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure to become effective on December 1, 2021.

This contains proposed amendments to Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure 3 and 6, and Forms 1 and 2, and Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure 2005, 3007, 7007.1, and 9036.

Additional information about these amendments is available at Amendments to the Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure (webpage).

Information about rules amendments and the rule-making process is available on uscourts.gov at United States Courts Rules & Policies.

Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure, Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure, Fed. R. App. P. 3, Fed. R. App. P. 6, Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure, Fed. R. Bankr. P. 2005, Fed. R. Bankr. P. 3007, Fed. R. Bankr. P. 7007.1, Fed. R. Bankr. P. 9036, Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, Fed. R. Civil P. 7.1 October 20, 2020
Amendments to the Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure 2021—Transmittal to the Judicial Conference

This package of materials was transmitted to the Judicial Conference, and it includes proposed amendments to the Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure to become effective on December 1, 2021.

  • Amendments to Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure 3 and 6 and Forms 1 and 2
  • Amendments to Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure 2005, 3007, 7007.1, and 9036

Additional information about these amendments is available on the Federal Judicial Center’s website at Amendments to the Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure (webpage).

Information about rules amendments and the rule-making process is available on uscourts.gov at United States Courts Rules & Policies.

Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure, Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure, Fed. R. App. P. 3, Fed. R. App. P. 6, Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure, Fed. R. Bankr. P. 2005, Fed. R. Bankr. P. 3007, Fed. R. Bankr. P. 7007.1, Fed. R. Bankr. P. 9036 September 15, 2020
How Rules of Procedure Are Developed and Revised in the U.S. Courts Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure June 26, 2020
Amendments to the Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure 2020—Transmittal to Congress

This package of materials was transmitted to Congress on April 27, 2020, concerning amendments to the Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure to become effective on December 1, 2020.

Amendments to the Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure are as follows:

  • Amendments to Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure 35 and 40.
  • Amendments to Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure 2002, 2004, 8012, 8013, 8015, and 8021.
  • Amendments to Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 30(b)(6).
  • Amendments to Federal Rule of Evidence 404.

Additional information about these amendments is available on the Federal Judicial Center’s website at Amendments to the Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure (webpage).

Information about rules amendments and the rule-making process is available on uscourts.gov at United States Courts Rules & Policies.

Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure, Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure, Fed. R. App. P. 35, Fed. R. App. P. 40, Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure, Fed. R. Bankr. P. 2002, Fed. R. Bankr. P. 2004, Fed. R. Bankr. P. 8012, Fed. R. Bankr. P. 8013, Fed. R. Bankr. P. 8015, Fed. R. Bankr. P. 8021, Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure, Fed. R. Crim. P. 30, Federal Rules of Evidence, Fed. R. Evid. 404 April 27, 2020
Amendments to the Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure: Evidence 2019—The Residual Hearsay Exception

In 2019, the residual hearsay exception, Federal Rules of Evidence 807, was amended to fix a number of problems that courts had encountered applying the rule. Hearsay is generally not admissible evidence because the speaker is not subject to examination or cross-examination to determine accuracy or truthfulness. But there are several enumerated exceptions to the general rule, as well as a residual exception for hearsay that does not satisfy an enumerated exception, but that has "sufficient guarantees of trustworthiness." Amendments include a required consideration of corroboration and changes to the notice requirements.

Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure, Federal Rules of Evidence, Fed. R. Evid. 607, Fed. R. Evid. 902 January 7, 2020
Amendments to the Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure 2020—Transmittal to the Supreme Court

This package of materials was transmitted to the U.S. Supreme Court on October 23, 2019, concerning amendments to the Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure to become effective on December 1, 2020.

This contains proposed amendments to Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure 35 and 40; Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure 2002, 2004, 8012, 8013, 8015, and 8021; Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 30(b)(6); and Federal Rule of Evidence 404.

Additional information about these amendments is available at Amendments to the Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure (webpage).

Information about rules amendments and the rule-making process is available on uscourts.gov at United States Courts Rules & Policies.

Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure, Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure, Fed. R. App. P. 35, Fed. R. App. P. 40, Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure, Fed. R. Bankr. P. 2002, Fed. R. Bankr. P. 2004, Fed. R. Bankr. P. 8012, Fed. R. Bankr. P. 8013, Fed. R. Bankr. P. 8015, Fed. R. Bankr. P. 8021, Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, Fed. R. Civil P. 30, Federal Rules of Evidence, Fed. R. Evid. 404 October 23, 2019
Amendments to the Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure 2020—Transmittal to the Judicial Conference

This package of materials was transmitted to the Judicial Conference, and it includes proposed amendments to the Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure to become effective on December 1, 2020.

  • Amendments to Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure 35 and 40
  • Amendments to Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure 2002, 2004, 8012, 8013, 8015, and 8021 and Form 122A-1
  • Amendments to Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 30(b)(6)
  • Amendments to Federal Rule of Evidence 404

Additional information about these amendments is available on the Federal Judicial Center’s website at Amendments to the Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure (webpage).

Information about rules amendments and the rule-making process is available on uscourts.gov at United States Courts Rules & Policies.

Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure, Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure, Fed. R. App. P. 35, Fed. R. App. P. 40, Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure, Fed. R. Bankr. P. 2002, Fed. R. Bankr. P. 2004, Fed. R. Bankr. P. 8012, Fed. R. Bankr. P. 8013, Fed. R. Bankr. P. 8015, Fed. R. Bankr. P. 8021, Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, Fed. R. Civil P. 30, Federal Rules of Evidence, Fed. R. Evid. 404 September 14, 2019
Amendments to the Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure 2019—Transmittal to Congress

This package of materials was transmitted to Congress on April 25, 2019, concerning amendments to the Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure to become effective on December 1, 2019.

Amendments to the Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure are as follows:

  • Amendments to Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure 3, 5, 13, 21, 25, 26, 26.1, 28, 32, and 39.
  • Amendments to Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure 4001, 6007, 9036, and 9037.
  • New Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 16.1 and amendments to Rules 5 of rules governing habeas corpus proceedings.
  • Amendments to Federal Rules of Evidence 807.

Additional information about these amendments is available on the Federal Judicial Center’s website at Amendments to the Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure (webpage).

Information about rules amendments and the rule-making process is available on uscourts.gov at United States Courts Rules & Policies.

Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure, Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure, Fed. R. App. P. 13, Fed. R. App. P. 21, Fed. R. App. P. 25, Fed. R. App. P. 26, Fed. R. App. P. 26.1, Fed. R. App. P. 28, Fed. R. App. P. 32, Fed. R. App. P. 39, Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure, Fed. R. Bankr. P. 4001, Fed. R. Bankr. P. 6007, Fed. R. Bankr. P. 9036, Fed. R. Bankr. P. 9037, Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure, Fed. R. Crim. P. 16.1, Fed. R. Crim. P. 5, Federal Rules of Evidence, Fed. R. Evid. 807 April 25, 2019
Unsuccessful Attempt at Federal Mandamus Relief Against State Election Officials

Fox v. Detzner (Mark E. Walker, N.D. Fla. 4:18-cv-529)
A district judge denied as beyond the court’s jurisdiction a federal mandamus action seeking an order requiring state election officials to follow the law. The judge also denied a request for a temporary restraining order because the plaintiffs did not comply with the notice requirements of Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 65.
Subject: Voting procedures. Topics: Voting technology; matters for state courts; case assignment.

One of many Case Studies in Emergency Election Litigation.

Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure, Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, Fed. R. Civil P. 65 April 3, 2019
Northern District of Illinois Mandatory Initial Discovery Pilot Project Standing Order

Beginning on June 1, 2017, the Northern District of Illinois is participating in a three-year pilot project known as the “Mandatory Initial Discovery Pilot Project,” which is studying whether requiring parties in civil cases to respond to a series of standard discovery requests before undertaking other discovery reduces the cost and delay of civil litigation. In this pilot project, when making mandatory initial discovery responses parties are required to disclose both favorable and unfavorable information that is relevant to their claims or defenses regardless of whether they intend to use the information in their cases.

General Order 17-0005 specifies that a Standing Order will be entered in all covered cases. The Standing Order, In re Mandatory Initial Discovery Pilot Program in the Northern District of Illinois, explains the parties’ obligations under the pilot project and sets forth the initial discovery requests to which the parties must respond. All civil cases assigned to participating judges, except those categories of cases exempted by the Standing Order, are included in the pilot program and subject to the Standing Order.

A Federal Judicial Center website displays additional information about the Mandatory Initial Discovery Pilot Project in the Northern District of Illinois.

Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure, Federal Rules of Civil Procedure December 1, 2018

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