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Scientific Evidence Resources

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Contains
Contains
Format: 2019
Greater than or equal to
February 7, 2019
Jed S. Rakoff

Senior District Judge Jed S. Rakoff elucidates the purpose of this web-based neuroscience program and highlights the important, continuing role neuroscience research plays in the legal system.

February 7, 2019
Andrea Gaede

This module provides a brief introduction to the brain and central nervous system. Dr. Andrea H. Gaede, a Science & Technology Policy Judicial Fellow from the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), answers the following questions:

  • What are the major components of the central nervous system?
  • How do neurons communicate?
  • How do neural networks facilitate our interactions with the world around us?

Objective:

February 7, 2019
Jed S. Rakoff

Judge Jed S. Rakoff provides concluding remarks.

February 7, 2019
David Brody

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a rich area of research that is growing in public interest and increasing in funding due to the rising awareness of brain injuries related to military service and athletic activities. This module highlights the ways in which TBI may alter brain function.

February 7, 2019
Craig Stark

In this module, Dr. Craig Stark from the University of California, Irvine, discusses how memory is encoded in the brain, how memories can be manipulated, and why these topics are relevant to the courts. He addresses the following questions:

February 7, 2019
David Thomas

In this module, Dr. David Thomas, founding member of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Pain Consortium, provides an overview of the neuroscience of pain and seeks to answer the following questions:

February 7, 2019
P. Read Montague

In this module, Dr. Read Montague, an American neuroscientist, popular science author, and professor at Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, describes how researchers are studying structure and connectivity in the human brain, what the data may tell us about criminal responsibility, and the impact that this research may have on the courts. He addresses the following questions:

February 7, 2019
John VanMeter

This module provides a basic overview of how functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technology works, what the data can tell a researcher, and what challenges those who seek to introduce fMRI data in court face.

February 7, 2019
Joshua Gordon, Walter Koroshetz

Dr. Walter Koroshetz, director of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), and Dr. Joshua Gordon, director of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), provide insight into the current trajectory of neuroscience research. They highlight the future direction of research funded by the NIH BRAIN Initiative, and by extension, the field of neuroscience. This discussion provides insight into neuroscience evidence that may appear in the courts in the near future.

Objectives:

February 7, 2019
Amanda Pustilnik

In this module, Amanda C. Pustilnik, professor of law at the University of Maryland, discusses approaches that judges could employ when evaluating emerging neurotechnology. She provides insight into the following questions:

  • What sort of framework can judges use in their approach to evaluating emerging neurotechnology?
  • Should there be specific standards for using neuroscience evidence?
  • What emerging technology do you foresee or predict lawyers will attempt to introduce as evidence in the near future?

Objectives:

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