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Pocket Guides

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This guide is intended to help judges to whom an MDL case has been transferred. Congress created the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation under 28 U.S.C. § 1407 and gave it the responsibility to transfer "civil actions involving one or more common questions of fact" from multiple districts to any single district for coordinated or consolidated pretrial proceedings. The Panel centralizes cases in order to promote the convenient, just and efficient conduct of the actions. After the Panel transfers cases under § 1407, it exercises virtually no further control over them.

Superseded by Ten Steps to Better Case Management: A Guide for Multidistrict Litigation Transferee Judges, Second Edition (2014).

In Print: Available for Distribution

This guide is intended to help transferee clerks of court successfully manage multidistrict litigation (MDL). It contains recommendations from the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation and suggestions for implementing the Case Management/Electronic Case Filing System (CM/ECF) to improve MDL case management.

Superseded by Ten Steps to Better Case Management: A Guide for Multidistrict Litigation Transferee Court Clerks, Second Edition (2014).

Available Online Only

This pocket guide helps federal judges manage the discovery of electronically stored information (ESI). It covers issues unique to the discovery of ESI, including its scope, the allocation of costs, the form of production, the waiver of privilege and work product protection, and the preservation of data and spoliation.

Superseded by Managing Discovery of Electronic Information: A Pocket Guide for Judges, Second Edition (2012).

In Print: Available for Distribution

A primer for judges on techniques and methods of case management.

Superseded by The Elements of Case Management, Third Edition (2017).

Available Online Only

This guide is designed to help federal judges manage the increased number of class actions expected as a result of the Class Action Fairness Act of 2005. As called for in that legislation, the guide is part of a continuing effort of the federal judiciary to identify "best practices" for managing class actions and ensuring that class action settlements primarily benefit class members.

Superseded by Managing Class Action Litigation: A Pocket Guide for Judges, Second Edition (2009).

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