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Detention

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January 5, 2018
Jake Kobrick, Daniel S. Holt

The concluding volume of the series covers debates concerning structural changes to the federal courts, including the creation of the U.S. magistrate and U.S. bankruptcy judge positions, and alterations to the federal appellate system, including the division of the Fifth Circuit, the creation of the Federal Circuit, and proposals for a national court of appeals. A section on criminal justice reform recounts debates over access to counsel for indigent defendants, detention before trial, habeas corpus, and the creation of the U.S. Sentencing Commission.

October 19, 2017

The Eighth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution prohibits the government from requiring a criminal defendant to pay "excessive bail" in order to get out of jail before trial. Nevertheless, nearly half a million people across the country are in pretrial detention. The collateral consequences of detention can affect a defendant's employment status, housing situation, and mental health, among other facets of his or her life.

October 19, 2017

The Eighth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution prohibits the government from requiring a criminal defendant to pay "excessive bail" in order to get out of jail before trial. Nevertheless, nearly half a million people across the country are in pretrial detention.

March 1, 2013
Federal Judicial Center
The Benchbook is an ongoing compilation of information that federal judges have found useful for immediate bench or chambers reference in civil and criminal proceedings. It contains sections on such topics as assignment of counsel, taking guilty pleas, standard voir dire questions, sentencing, and contempt. The sixth edition, published March 2013, adds new sections on disclosure of exculpatory information under Brady v. Maryland, civil case management, and restraint of dangerous defendants (“shackling”).
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January 1, 2006
David N. Adair

The Bail Reform Act of 1984, Third Edition provides a summary of appellate court decisions interpreting provisions of The Bail Reform Act of 1984 on issues of release and detention. The Third Edition primarily addresses areas that have been changed by statute or case law since the second edition, and cites more recent cases that discuss the substantive issues through June 1, 2006. In addition, the monograph covers practical considerations regarding conditional release, release orders, detention hearings, and waiver.

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March 1, 1998

In this issue:

  • The Amistad Case and the Federal Courts
  • Documenting the Careers of Federal Judges

The Court Historian was an occasional newsletter (discontinued) from the Federal Judicial History Office.

All issues published from 1989 to 1998.

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