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Judges & the Art of Judging

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January 23, 2019
Christine Porath, Lori A. Murphy, Michael E. Siegel

Executive Edge is an audio podcast designed to bring cutting-edge thinking about public- and private-sector leadership to the attention of judiciary executives. Each episode includes a conversation with one or more thought leaders whose research and expertise are relevant to the work of executives in the federal courts.

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January 26, 2016
Jeremy D. Fogel

This is a primer on mindfulness and its uses in judging. Mindfulness involves slowing down one’s mental processes enough to allow one to notice as much as possible about a given moment or situation, and then to act thoughtfully based on what one has noticed. Much of the discussion of mindfulness in relation to judges so far has focused on health and wellness, but mindfulness also has obvious implications for the actual work that judges do.

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October 18, 2006
Nicholle Stahl-Reisdorff

In 1999, at the direction of the Judicial Officers Resources Working Group appointed by the Chief Justice, the Center conducted studies of the use of visiting judges in the district courts. Interviews showed that many borrowing courts have created successful visiting judge procedures that minimize administrative burdens and maximize benefits to the court and to the visitors.

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October 1, 2003
Jennifer Evans Marsh

In 1999, at the direction of the Judicial Officers Resources Working Group appointed by the Chief Justice, the Center conducted studies of the use of visiting judges in the district courts. Interviews showed that many borrowing courts have created successful visiting judge procedures that minimize administrative burdens and maximize benefits to the court and to the visitors.

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January 1, 2001
Jennifer Evans Marsh

Superseded by The Use of Visiting Judges in the Federal District Courts: A Guide for Judges and Court Personnel (updated 2003).In 1999, at the direction of the Judicial Officers Resources Working Group appointed by the Chief Justice, the Center conducted studies of the use of visiting judges in the district courts. Interviews showed that many borrowing courts have created successful visiting judge procedures that minimize administrative burdens and maximize benefits to the court and to the visitors.

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January 1, 2001

Form 1: Initial Case Management Scheduling Order

Form 2: Order for Rule 26(f) Planning Meeting and Rule 16(b) Scheduling Conference

Form 3: Initial Scheduling Order

Form 4: Guidelines for Discovery, Motion Practice and Trial

Form 5: Individual Practices of Judge Miriam Goldman Cedarbaum

Form 6: Recommended Model for Individual Judge’s Practices

Form 7: Standing Order for Matters Before Judge Martin J. Jenkins

Form 8: Instructions Regarding Pretrial Proceedings

Form 9: Standing Pretrial Procedure Order and Forms

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January 1, 2001
Mira Gur-Arie, Russell R. Wheeler

Judicial Independence in the United States: Current Issues and Relevant Background Information is published by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) as a chapter in Guidance for Promoting Judicial Independence and Impartiality, pp. 133-146. The guide seeks to promote understanding of the issues surrounding judicial independence and to assist USAID and other donors, in collaboration with their local counterparts, to design and implement programs that effectively strengthen judicial independence. The guide is based primarily on input from experts in 26 countries.

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August 2, 1993
Robert W. Kastenmeier

In 1990, Congress created the National Commission on Judicial Discipline and Removal, who's charge included investigation of problems related to the discipline and removal of life-tenured federal judges, and evaluation of alternatives to current arrangements for judicial discipline and removal, including statutory and constitutional amendments.

January 1, 1993
Emily Field Van Tassel, Beverly Hudson Wirtz, Peter A. Wonders

Provides a historical perspective on the reasons federal judges have left the bench. The study focuses on the fewer than 200 judges who, over the last 200 years, resigned from the bench for stated reasons other than age or health. The Center prepared the study for the National Commission on Judicial Discipline and Removal.

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