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This guide describes the statutes, case law, and policies applicable to federal death penalty case-management issues such as appointment of counsel, case budgeting, and jury selection, and summarizes procedures judges have used in capital cases at each stage of the proceedings. Although information in the guide is generally current to the revision date that follows the title, some portions may become dated as case law develops and new approaches emerge to managing federal death penalty cases.

This is the first part of a two-volume resource guide for managing capital cases in the federal courts. For the second volume, see Resource Guide for Managing Capital Cases, Volume II: Habeas Corpus Review of Capital Convictions.

In Print: Available for Distribution

This work describes approaches that trial judges have found to be useful in managing complex cases. This edition updates the treatment of electronic discovery and other aspects of pretrial management and describes major changes affecting case management in the substantive and procedural law in mass torts, class actions, intellectual property, employment discrimination, and other types of litigation. A new chapter deals with managing scientific evidence. This fourth edition was published in March 2004.

Individual sample orders have been excerpted from the manual and are available below.

In Print: Available for Distribution

A detailed reference for chief judges of federal district courts. The Deskbook describes the position of chief judges within the system of federal judicial administration as well as their specific roles and responsibilities with respect to national and regional bodies of judicial administration; other judges, officers, and employees of the district court; various functions of the court; and external groups such as the bar, media, and public. Includes citations to statutory requirements and Judicial Conference and Administrative Office policies.

Superseded by Deskbook for Chief Judges of U.S. District Courts, Fourth Edition (2014).

Available Online Only

In response to requests from chief judges and as a follow-up to a 2000 conference for appellate judges, the Center developed this common template that each circuit could use to develop its own deskbook for chief judges. It provides a comprehensive list of activities that chief judges and others undertake pursuant to statute, to Judicial Conference policies, or simply because of the imperatives of administering a circuit. 

Superseded by Resource Guide for Chief Circuit Judges’ Deskbooks (2019).

Available Online Only

This manual provides trial judges a handbook on managing civil cases. It sets out a wide array of case-management techniques, beginning with case filing and concluding with steps for streamlining trials and discusses a number of special topics, including pro se and high visibility cases, the role of staff, and automation that supports case management. The manual, which was produced in response to the Civil Justice Reform Act of 1990, is based on the experiences of federal district and magistrate judges and reflects techniques they have developed.

For the original English language publication see Civil Litigation Management Manual (2001)

This publication was translated to Russian and published by the U.S. Agency for International Development. The Federal Judicial Center cannot vouch for the accuracy of the translation.

In Print: Available for Distribution

This manual provides trial judges a handbook on managing civil cases. It sets out a wide array of case-management techniques, beginning with case filing and concluding with steps for streamlining trials and discusses a number of special topics, including pro se and high visibility cases, the role of staff, and automation that supports case management. The manual, which was produced in response to the Civil Justice Reform Act of 1990, is based on the experiences of federal district and magistrate judges and reflects techniques they have developed. It was prepared under the direction of the Judicial Conference Committee on Court Administration and Case Management, with substantial contributions from the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts and the Federal Judicial Center, and was approved by the Judicial Conference in March 2001.

Other editions:

Civil Litigation Management Manual, Second Edition (2010)

Manual for Litigation Management and Cost and Delay Reduction [Superseded] (1992)

In Print: Available for Distribution
Note: Distribution of this publication (hard copy) is restricted per National Institute for Trial Advocacy; permission has been granted for judiciary distribution only. Copies are available to the general public from National Institute for Trial Advocacy.
 

This publication is the result of a joint project between the Federal Judicial Center and the National Institute for Trial Advocacy. It describes the substantive and procedural considerations that may arise when lawyers bring electronic equipment to the courtroom or use court-provided equipment for displaying or playing evidentiary exhibits or illustrative aids during trial. It draws upon the expertise of judges who work in courtrooms equipped with technology, law professors who teach trial advocacy and evidence, and practitioners who have trial experience using technology in civil and criminal cases. It collects practical experience and expert judgments, but does not purport to test these observations empirically or analyze case law. Although various forms of courtroom technology have been around since the 1970s, and model courtrooms equipped with technology began appearing in law schools in 1990, little scientific research has been done in the field and relatively little case law exists.

This guide is part of a larger Federal Judicial Center project examining the impact of technology on the adversary process. The central objective of the guide is to make it easier for judges and parties to benefit from courtroom technology without unduly complicating the pretrial and trial processes and without tilting the playing field. It comes with a CD-ROM that contains the entire text of the book for easy searching, reference, or excerpting, and includes examples of the kinds of exhibits that may raise objections as to transitions, animations, color, sound, and special effects.

In Print: Available for Distribution

This publication offers guidance to federal trial and bankruptcy courts on when and how to refer appropriate cases to ADR and how to manage cases referred to ADR. FJC research found that although much has been written about basic ADR concepts, little comprehensive, easily accessible advice on ADR referrals had been written from the court's perspective. The purpose of the book is not to advocate ADR use but rather to present various approaches that judges and parties may choose to follow when considering and using ADR. The book identifies areas where there may be disagreement, describing advantages and disadvantages of various approaches. The book also alerts readers to emerging trends or what are perceived by many as preferred approaches. The publication's ten chapters have titles including "Considering the Use of ADR: How and When"; "Selecting Cases Appropriate for ADR"; and "Matching the ADR Process to the Case." Other topics covered are neutral selection and compensation; party consent; client attendance; party participation; confidentiality; referral orders and case management issues.

Available Online Only

The fifth edition of the late Judge Voorhees's guide to the law governing many of the procedural matters that arise in criminal trials. The material, which was originally prepared for Center seminars for newly appointed district judges, has been updated to include cases decided during the Supreme Court's 2000-2001 Term and U.S. Court of Appeals cases reported through 212 F.3d 306. Among the topics covered are jury-related problems, evidentiary issues, civil and criminal contempt, the Fifth Amendment, confessions, and severance of defendants.

Superseded by Manual on Recurring Problems in Criminal Trials, Sixth Edition (2010).

Archival Copy on File

An ongoing compilation of information that federal district judges have found useful for immediate bench or chambers reference. The Benchbook contains sections on such topics as assignment of counsel, taking guilty pleas, model sentencing forms, standard voir dire questions, and oaths. It is prepared under the guidance of experienced district judges and is produced in loose-leaf format for easy supplementation.

Superseded by Benchbook for U.S. District Court Judges, Fifth Edition (2007).

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