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Caseloads & Case Weights

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Judge Charles Clark's prepared statement on the civil dockets before the U.S. House of Representatives' Committee on the Judiciary

Archival Copy on File

A joint Federal Judicial Center and Administrative Office publication containing court statistics for the District of Maine

In Print: Available for Distribution

At the request of the Judicial Conference Committee on the Administration of the Bankruptcy System, during fiscal year 1989, the Center surveyed the caseloads of 272 bankruptcy judges (97% of those sitting at the time). The data collected in the survey formed the basis of seventeen case weights, which are the average amounts of time bankruptcy judges spent on the matters that came before them. The Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts uses the case weights to calculate weighted caseloads for each bankruptcy court, and the Judicial Conference uses this information as a major factor in assessing the need for bankruptcy judgeships.

Reprinted from 65 American Bankruptcy Law Journal 491 (1991).

Archival Copy on File

David L. Cook provides Administrative Office Director L. Ralph Mecham with updated analysis of the Rand Corporation Report on expense and delay in civil cases.

Available Online Only

In November 1987, the Federal Judicial Center commenced its third major "time study" in the U.S. district courts. Like studies conducted in 1969 and 1979, the purpose of the new study is to develop case "weights" for district court civil and criminal cases.Case weights reflect the difference in average judge time demanded by different types of cases (antitrust cases, for example, have a much higher weight than automobile personal injury cases). Totaling the weights assigned to all cases filed in a district in a particular year yields a measure of the total judicial workload in that district, the district's "weighted filings." Compared to a simple count of the number of cases filed, the weighted filing index is a superior statistical indicator of the burden imposed by a district's caseload.

Archival Copy on File

A research brief on civil justice expense and delay published by the International Court of Justice

Archival Copy on File

Text of H.R.5316, including appendices

In Print: Available for Distribution

A report, prepared as asbestos litigation was becoming a growing presence on federal dockets, based on an intensive study of ten federal district courts with heavy asbestos caseloads. The author examines both innovative and traditional methods of handling the asbestos caseload in the federal courts. He makes projections as to the expected future caseload and compares asbestos cases with other types of toxic tort litigation. Major topics include assignment systems, standard pretrial procedures, settlement, consolidation and other trial formats, and special burdens on judges and clerks.

In Print: Available for Distribution

A description of a series of innovations adopted by the Ninth Circuit court of appeals from 1980 to 1982. The report outlines the court's Submission-Without-Argument and Prebriefing Conference programs and its modifications in the calendaring of oral arguments, and it reviews the effects of these innovations on case processing and the circuit's workload.

In Print: Available for Distribution

A description of the methods used by eighteen district courts to ensure that a visiting judge's stay is satisfying and productive for both the visitor and the court. Issues covered include selection and preparation of the visiting judge's caseload, orientation to the court, and the visitor's impact on court staff and facilities.

Superseded by The Use of Visiting Judges in the Federal District Courts: A Guide for Judges and Court Personnel (2006).

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