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Materials About the Federal Rules

The materials listed below, produced or made available by the Center, are related to the Federal Rules of Procedure (civil, criminal, evidence, appellate, and bankruptcy).

For a list of projects or other reports of FJC research that the Center has published, click on Research Projects or Reports and Studies.

Displaying 171 - 180 of 202
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Sealing Court Records and Proceedings: A Pocket Guide

Court case records and proceedings are presumptively public, but occasionally there are compelling reasons for keeping all or parts of them confidential, sometimes permanently but often only temporarily. This pocket guide summarizes the case law on sealing records and proceedings and presents a useful procedural checklist of seven principles to follow when denying public access.

Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure December 15, 2010
Securities Class Action Certification and Settlement: Full Notice Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, Fed. R. Civil P. 23 May 10, 2005
Securities Class Action Certification and Settlement: Publication Notice Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, Fed. R. Civil P. 23 May 10, 2005
Securities Class Action Certification and Settlement: Publication Notice [Spanish-language version] Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure, Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, Fed. R. Civil P. 23 May 10, 2005
Securities Class Action: Language for Envelope Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, Fed. R. Civil P. 23 May 10, 2001
Securities Class Action: PSLRA Cover Letter Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, Fed. R. Civil P. 23 May 10, 2003
Social Security Numbers in Federal Court Documents

Memorandum to the Privacy Subcommittee of the Judicial Conference Committee on Rules of Practice and Procedure, April 5, 2010.

Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure, Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure, Fed. R. Bankr. P. 9037, Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, Fed. R. Civil P. 5.2, Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure, Fed. R. Crim. P. 49.1 April 5, 2010
Special Masters [Superseded]

Offers suggestions for the use of special masters pursuant to Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 53.

Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure, Fed. R. Crim. P. 53 January 1, 1994
Special Masters' Incidence and Activity: Report to the Judicial Conference's Advisory Committee on Civil Rules and Its Subcommittee on Special Masters

The Special Masters' Subcommittee of the Advisory Committee on Civil Rules of the Judicial Conference asked the Center to examine how often judges appointed special masters and what functions they asked masters to perform. This report documents the incidence of recent special master consideration and appointment. The authors found that such activity was rare and occurred primarily in high-stakes cases that were especially complex. Party initiative, consent, or acquiescence provided the foundation for appointments and the basis for authorizing activities not contemplated by Rule 53. The subcommittee used the report along with other information in framing a proposed revision of Rule 53 that was published in August 2001.

Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, Fed. R. Civil P. 53 August 9, 2000
State Court Procedures Regarding Pre-Verdict Judgments of Acquittal and the State's Right to Appeal Those Judgments

The Department of Justice (DOJ) has proposed amending Rule 29 to preserve the government's right to appeal a trial court's decision to grant a motion for judgment of acquittal. DOJ argues, "Rule 29 as currently constituted represents an anomaly within the Rules and indeed within the judicial system." 

To help inform the debate, the Advisory Committee on Criminal Rules of the Judicial Conference of the United States asked the Federal Judicial Center to conduct a study of state laws that allow the trial judge to grant a motion for a judgment of acquittal prior to the case's submission to the jury. Specifically, the Committee wanted to know (1) whether a state judge may enter a judgment of acquittal before a jury verdict, and (2) whether the prosecution may appeal from judgments of acquittal directed by the trial judge prior to submission of the case to the jury.

Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure, Fed. R. Crim. P. 29 September 30, 2003

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