You are here

U.S. Circuit Courts, 1801-1802: Legislative History

February 13, 1801
2 Stat. 89

The Judiciary Act of 1801 established six regional circuit courts to replace the circuit courts organized by judicial districts. The Act placed the districts of Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Circuit Court for the First Circuit; the districts of Connecticut, Vermont, Albany, and New York under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Circuit Court for the Second Circuit; the districts of Jersey and Delaware and the Eastern and Western districts of Pennsylvania under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Circuit Court for the Third Circuit; the district of Maryland and the Eastern and Western districts of Virginia under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Circuit Court for the Fourth Circuit; the districts of North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Circuit Court for the Fifth Circuit; and the district of Ohio (created by combining the territory northwest of the Ohio and the Indiana Territory), the districts of East and West Tennessee, and the district of Kentucky under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Circuit Court for the Sixth Circuit. The act authorized three circuit judgeships for each of the first five circuits, and provided that the Sixth Circuit would be presided over by one circuit judge and the district judges for Tennessee and Kentucky.

March 8, 1802
2 Stat. 132

Congress repealed the Judiciary Act of 1801 and restored the organization of the judiciary in effect before 1801.

U.S. Circuit Courts, 1801-1802