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Federal Judicial Circuits: District of Columbia Circuit

  • 1893: The act (27 Stat. 434) establishing the Court of Appeals of the District of Columbia made no reference to a District of Columbia Circuit and did not include "Circuit" in the title of the court. In 1922, the Supreme Court in Swift & Co. et al. v. United States declared that the District of Columbia Court of Appeals was a U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals within the terms of the act in question. Congress in 1934 (48 Stat. 926) changed the name of the court to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. A statute (50 Stat. 473) of 1937 provided the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia with representation on the Conference of Senior Circuit Judges (later the Judicial Conference of the United States). In a series of acts between 1937 and 1948, Congress declared that the District of Columbia was to be considered a judicial circuit for the terms of the individual acts.
  • 1948: The Judicial Code of 1948 (62 Stat. 870) declared the District of Columbia to be one of the eleven judicial circuits of the United States.